The impact of our work

Annual Report 2016 Case Studies

Everyone in our organisation shares the same purpose:
to drive improvements in health and social care.

One organisation, many parts, one purpose

 

People in Scotland are living longer, healthier lives and, as the needs of our society are changing, so too are the nature and form of our health and social services. Our current health and social care system needs to change to cope with the demand that will be generated by our ageing population.

 

Right now, health and social care services across Scotland are undergoing unprecedented transformational change in the way services are organised and delivered in order to be fit for the future.

 

Our role is to support health and social care providers to continue to deliver the highest standards of care and to help them respond to integration and the changing needs of patients in a way that will be sustainable for years to come.

 

Everyone in our organisation shares the same purpose: to drive improvements in health and social care. In Healthcare Improvement Scotland we have a number of ways to support improvement and our organisation includes:

 

  • The Healthcare Environment Inspectorate, helping reduce the risk of healthcare associated infection to patients by inspecting hospitals in Scotland to ensure they are safe and clean.
  • The Improvement Hub (or ihub for short), supporting health and social care organisations to design and deliver services that better meet the changing needs of people in Scotland.
  •  The Scottish Health Council, supporting people to have a meaningful say in shaping health and social care services.
  •  The Scottish Medicines Consortium, accepting for routine use those newly-licensed medicines that are effective and clearly represent good value for money to NHSScotland.
  •  The Scottish Health Technologies Group, providing advice on the clinical and cost-effectiveness of healthcare technologies that are likely to have significant implications for patient care in Scotland.
  •  The Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network, developing evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for NHSScotland.

 

Our seven contributions

 

To support this transformational change, we have committed to making seven key contributions to improving health and social care services:

 

  • supporting the use of data and information, alongside bespoke support, to help services to improve
  • supporting people to have a meaningful say in how services are designed, delivered and experienced
  • providing independent quality assurance that gives people confidence in the quality of services and helps providers to improve
  • supporting providers to redesign services so that people in Scotland are able to live longer, healthier lives at home or a homely setting
  • supporting services to reduce harm, waste and unnecessary variation in practice and outcomes
  • providing evidence and knowledge that enables people to get the best out of the services that they use and helps services to improve, and
  • supporting leaders to create the conditions where quality will flourish.

 

Individually and collectively, these contributions help drive improvement in the care people receive across Scotland.

 

The following case studies illustrate how our work helps drive improvements for people and services across health and social care in Scotland. The case studies feature in our Annual Report 2016 which can be downloaded by using the link above.

 

Supporting the use of data and information, alongside bespoke support, to help services to improve

Rob's story

Rob McCulloch-Graham is Chief Officer of Edinburgh Health and Social Care Partnership. In September 2015, the Edinburgh Health and Social Care Partnership asked our Improvement Hub (ihub)to provide a package of improvement support to help them address their local priorities. The ihub’s Tailored and Responsive Improvement Support (TRIST) programme, which provides flexible improvement support to NHS boards and Health and Social Care Partnerships, is supporting the partnership by focusing on the following areas:

  • mapping the connections across the health and social care system in Edinburgh
  • supporting the partnership to deliver change, and to understand the benefits of this change for itself and for local service users, and
  • developing an evaluation to understand how the partnership is learning about the process of change they are going through and how that learning can be used to accelerate the pace of change.

 

“The Edinburgh Health and Social Care Partnership is currently delivering a huge programme of change, which includes the integration of two massive organisations, redesigning the entire pathway of care for service users to address the significant increases in demand and reduction in available resources, and eliminating delayed discharges. Healthcare Improvement Scotland’s ihub has played a key role supporting the process to date, primarily by mapping the whole system, applying improvement methodology, and providing additional capacity to support key initiatives. Throughout this process, Healthcare Improvement Scotland staff have felt like part of our team rather than outsiders.”

 

Rob McCulloch-Graham

Edinburgh Health and Social Care Partnership

 

Ian Clement

Patient perspective on our glaucoma guidelines

 

Supporting people to have a meaningful say in how services are designed, delivered and experienced

Ian's story

Ian Clement was first diagnosed with glaucoma more than 20 years ago and used his own perspective and experience to help us develop a new national guideline for clinicians to use which will help the referral and safe discharge of people with glaucoma across Scotland. Ian was a patient representative on the guideline development group and an important voice in the development of the guideline.

 

“As someone who has lived with glaucoma for more than 20 years, I was pleased to be given the opportunity to bring my own experience and insight to the guideline development group. I was able to offer the patient’s perspective on what are the most important considerations for people who have glaucoma. We developed a patient version of the guideline and I helped to shape its content, format and design. I believe the resulting booklet is an invaluable resource of information and advice for people who have glaucoma. It is written in plain language and uses a large font with graphics and bright colours so that it’s easier to read for people who may be visually impaired. Having all of this information in one accessible document helps to take away a lot of the fear that people may experience and provides real reassurance for those of us living with this condition.”

 

 

Providing independent quality assurance that gives people confidence in the quality of services and helps providers to improve

Rachael's story

Rachael MacDonald is a Midwifery Manager with NHS Grampian and has experienced a number of inspections on hospital safety and cleanliness – one of a number of ways Healthcare Improvement Scotland provides assessments of the quality of health and social care in Scotland which are designed to promote improvements.

 

“I’ve been involved in four or five inspections now and they are a welcome chance to look at what we are doing well and where we can improve. It can sometimes be difficult to do that in the business of our day-to-day work. Naturally, inspections can sometimes cause some staff a degree of apprehension beforehand but it’s clear that the inspectors’ main focus is to ensure that standards are met. Inspectors give advice and help us to spot any potential risks. The feedback we get is constructive, helpful and shows a great understanding of our circumstances and the challenges we face.”

 

Rachael MacDonald

Midwifery Manager

 

Peter Anderson

Former professional angler

 

Supporting providers to redesign services so that people in Scotland are able to live longer, healthier lives at home or a homely setting

Peter's story

Peter Anderson, 90, is a former professional world champion angler. In an illustrious career, he has taught hundreds of people to fish, including the Queen Mother and Frank Sinatra. Over the past year, he spent several weeks in hospital in NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde while being treated for an ischaemic foot (a lack of blood flow from the heart to the limb due to obstructed arteries). While in hospital, he also experienced severe delirium. Happily, he is now back at home and his recovery is continuing.

 

“It has been a difficult time for me as I was in a lot of pain and it wasn’t always easy to know what was going on but I can’t speak highly enough of the nurses and the care they provided. They were so attentive and kept me informed about my condition and what they were doing. They couldn't do enough for you, no matter how busy they were. They also put a ‘What matters to me’ poster above my bed and this was a great help as it meant all of the nurses knew a bit more about me and could talk to me about my interests. It’s good to be back at home now, and I’ve even managed to do a bit of fishing since was discharged.”

 

 

 

 

Supporting services to reduce harm,
waste and unnecessary variation in practice and outcomes

Santosh's story

Santosh Salunke, Consultant Gastroenterologist with NHS Forth Valley, was a member of our expert advisory group that developed a national framework on biosimilar medicines (medicines which are similar to another medicine which has already been licensed).

 

“The development of national guidance around the use of biosimilar medicines, in particular those used for patients affected with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, is a significant achievement. This has had three major benefits. Firstly, it has guided hospitals in Scotland in redesigning the way they provide services to patients suffering from complex conditions. Secondly, it has provided a platform for clinicians to provide individualised and person-centred care. Finally, and above all, it has enabled our patients to have better access to treatments, as well as better access to education about their condition and treatment. This piece of work puts us in an excellent position where we are seeing real benefits to patients, services and NHSScotland as a whole.”

 

 

Santosh Salunke

Consultant Gastroenterologist

 

Lynne Campbell

A mothers' perspective

Lynne's story

Lynne Campbell was 30 weeks pregnant when she became aware that she hadn’t felt her unborn baby move for more than 24 hours. She recalled an earlier conversation with her midwife who had stressed the importance of being aware of the baby’s movements – a practice that is promoted by our Maternity and Children Quality Improvement Collaborative (MCQIC) – and that she should contact the hospital if anything changed.

 

“I was worried because the baby had previously been very active, but there had been little or no movement for a day or so. I remembered my midwife had told me not to hesitate to get in touch if anything changed and she had also given me some leaflets to take away. After reading the leaflets, we decided to call the midwife, even though it was the middle of the night. She advised us to come to the hospital immediately to get checked. Following some tests, I was urgently transferred by ambulance to the maternity unit in Dundee. Within 15 minutes, Innes was delivered by caesarean section. He was 10 weeks early, weighing only 3lbs and 15 oz, and was kept in hospital for a few weeks. Innes is now a happy, healthy little boy. I’m so thankful I had that conversation with the midwife, and that I read the leaflets she gave me.”

 

 

 

 

Providing evidence and knowledge that enables people to get the best out of the services that they use and helps services to improve

Eileen's story

Eileen Moulton is Operations Co-ordinator with Skin Conditions Campaign Scotland (SCCS), a registered charity which works to improve the care and treatment of people who live with skin conditions in Scotland. SCCS has made a number of patient submissions to the Scottish Medicines Consortium (SMC) relating to medicines that are licensed to treat conditions, including:

 

  • rosacea (a long-term skin condition which causes redness and a burning sensation in the face), and
  • chronic spontaneous urticaria (a distressing skin condition that causes red, swollen, itchy and sometimes painful hives).

 

“It is hugely important that SMC is listening to the patient voice. By sharing the real, lived experiences of people who live with skin conditions, we have helped to give SMC a real insight into the impact they can have on people’s lives. This means that SMC is not just looking at the clinical and cost effectiveness of medicines, it is also taking account of the psychological and practical aspects of having these conditions so that it can make fully informed decisions."

 

 

 

Eileen Moulton

Skin conditions charity

 

Dr Akintoye Akinola

Specialty Doctor for Quality Improvement

 

Supporting leaders to create the conditions where quality will flourish

Akintoye's story

Dr Akintoye Akinola is Specialty Doctor for Quality Improvement at the Golden Jubilee National Hospital, Clydebank. He co-ordinates an “Improvement Club” that uses QI Connect as a means to bring together staff from across the hospital to share ideas for quality improvement.

 

“Our Improvement Club aims to promote quality improvement in the organisation. In general, the interest and engagement during each of the live QI Connect WebEx sessions has been great. The topics, the presentation and the different phases of each session have been excellent. After each live session, we spend 10-20 minutes discussing aspects relevant to our organisation in terms of our aspirations for developing our capacity for quality improvement ensuring we meet our vision to lead quality, research and innovation for NHSScotland.”

 

 

 

 

 

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Supporting the use of data and information, alongside bespoke support, to help services to improve

Rob's story

Rob McCulloch-Graham is Chief Officer of Edinburgh Health and Social Care Partnership. In September 2015, the Edinburgh Health and Social Care Partnership asked our Improvement Hub (ihub)to provide a package of improvement support to help them address their local priorities. The ihub’s Tailored and Responsive Improvement Support (TRIST) programme, which provides flexible improvement support to NHS boards and Health and Social Care Partnerships, is supporting the partnership by focusing on the following areas:

  • mapping the connections across the health and social care system in Edinburgh
  • supporting the partnership to deliver change, and to understand the benefits of this change for itself and for local service users, and
  • developing an evaluation to understand how the partnership is learning about the process of change they are going through and how that learning can be used to accelerate the pace of change.

 

“The Edinburgh Health and Social Care Partnership is currently delivering a huge programme of change, which includes the integration of two massive organisations, redesigning the entire pathway of care for service users to address the significant increases in demand and reduction in available resources, and eliminating delayed discharges. Healthcare Improvement Scotland’s ihub has played a key role supporting the process to date, primarily by mapping the whole system, applying improvement methodology, and providing additional capacity to support key initiatives. Throughout this process, Healthcare Improvement Scotland staff have felt like part of our team rather than outsiders.”

 

Supporting people to have a meaningful say in how services are designed, delivered and experienced

Ian's story

Ian Clement was first diagnosed with glaucoma more than 20 years ago and used his own perspective and experience to help us develop a new national guideline for clinicians to use which will help the referral and safe discharge of people with glaucoma across Scotland. Ian was a patient representative on the guideline development group and an important voice in the development of the guideline.

 

“As someone who has lived with glaucoma for more than 20 years, I was pleased to be given the opportunity to bring my own experience and insight to the guideline development group. I was able to offer the patient’s perspective on what are the most important considerations for people who have glaucoma. We developed a patient version of the guideline and I helped to shape its content, format and design. I believe the resulting booklet is an invaluable resource of information and advice for people who have glaucoma. It is written in plain language and uses a large font with graphics and bright colours so that it’s easier to read for people who may be visually impaired. Having all of this information in one accessible document helps to take away a lot of the fear that people may experience and provides real reassurance for those of us living with this condition.”

 

 

Providing independent quality assurance that gives people confidence in the quality of services and helps providers to improve

Rachael's story

Rachael MacDonald is a Midwifery Manager with NHS Grampian and has experienced a number of inspections on hospital safety and cleanliness – one of a number of ways Healthcare Improvement Scotland provides assessments of the quality of health and social care in Scotland which are designed to promote improvements.

 

“I’ve been involved in four or five inspections now and they are a welcome chance to look at what we are doing well and where we can improve. It can sometimes be difficult to do that in the business of our day-to-day work. Naturally, inspections can sometimes cause some staff a degree of apprehension beforehand but it’s clear that the inspectors’ main focus is to ensure that standards are met. Inspectors give advice and help us to spot any potential risks. The feedback we get is constructive, helpful and shows a great understanding of our circumstances and the challenges we face.”

 

 

Supporting providers to redesign services so that people in Scotland are able to live longer, healthier lives at home or a homely setting

Peter's story

Peter Anderson, 90, is a former professional world champion angler. In an illustrious career, he has taught hundreds of people to fish, including the Queen Mother and Frank Sinatra. Over the past year, he spent several weeks in hospital in NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde while being treated for an ischaemic foot (a lack of blood flow from the heart to the limb due to obstructed arteries). While in hospital, he also experienced severe delirium. Happily, he is now back at home and his recovery is continuing.

 

“It has been a difficult time for me as I was in a lot of pain and it wasn’t always easy to know what was going on but I can’t speak highly enough of the nurses and the care they provided. They were so attentive and kept me informed about my condition and what they were doing. They couldn't do enough for you, no matter how busy they were. They also put a ‘What matters to me’ poster above my bed and this was a great help as it meant all of the nurses knew a bit more about me and could talk to me about my interests. It’s good to be back at home now, and I’ve even managed to do a bit of fishing since was discharged.”

 

 

 

Supporting services to reduce harm,
waste and unnecessary variation in practice and outcomes

Santosh's story

Santosh Salunke, Consultant Gastroenterologist with NHS Forth Valley, was a member of our expert advisory group that developed a national framework on biosimilar medicines (medicines which are similar to another medicine which has already been licensed).

 

“The development of national guidance around the use of biosimilar medicines, in particular those used for patients affected with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, is a significant achievement. This has had three major benefits. Firstly, it has guided hospitals in Scotland in redesigning the way they provide services to patients suffering from complex conditions. Secondly, it has provided a platform for clinicians to provide individualised and person-centred care. Finally, and above all, it has enabled our patients to have better access to treatments, as well as better access to education about their condition and treatment. This piece of work puts us in an excellent position where we are seeing real benefits to patients, services and NHSScotland as a whole.”

 

Lynne's story

Lynne Campbell was 30 weeks pregnant when she became aware that she hadn’t felt her unborn baby move for more than 24 hours. She recalled an earlier conversation with her midwife who had stressed the importance of being aware of the baby’s movements – a practice that is promoted by our Maternity and Children Quality Improvement Collaborative (MCQIC) – and that she should contact the hospital if anything changed.

 

“I was worried because the baby had previously been very active, but there had been little or no movement for a day or so. I remembered my midwife had told me not to hesitate to get in touch if anything changed and she had also given me some leaflets to take away. After reading the leaflets, we decided to call the midwife, even though it was the middle of the night. She advised us to come to the hospital immediately to get checked. Following some tests, I was urgently transferred by ambulance to the maternity unit in Dundee. Within 15 minutes, Innes was delivered by caesarean section. He was 10 weeks early, weighing only 3lbs and 15 oz, and was kept in hospital for a few weeks. Innes is now a happy, healthy little boy. I’m so thankful I had that conversation with the midwife, and that I read the leaflets she gave me.”

 

 

Providing evidence and knowledge that enables people to get the best out of the services that they use and helps services to improve

Eileen's story

Eileen Moulton is Operations Co-ordinator with Skin Conditions Campaign Scotland (SCCS), a registered charity which works to improve the care and treatment of people who live with skin conditions in Scotland. SCCS has made a number of patient submissions to the Scottish Medicines Consortium (SMC) relating to medicines that are licensed to treat conditions, including:

 

  • rosacea (a long-term skin condition which causes redness and a burning sensation in the face), and
  • chronic spontaneous urticaria (a distressing skin condition that causes red, swollen, itchy and sometimes painful hives).

 

“It is hugely important that SMC is listening to the patient voice. By sharing the real, lived experiences of people who live with skin conditions, we have helped to give SMC a real insight into the impact they can have on people’s lives. This means that SMC is not just looking at the clinical and cost effectiveness of medicines, it is also taking account of the psychological and practical aspects of having these conditions so that it can make fully informed decisions."

 

 

Supporting leaders to create the conditions where quality will flourish

Akintoye's story

Dr Akintoye Akinola is Specialty Doctor for Quality Improvement at the Golden Jubilee National Hospital, Clydebank. He co-ordinates an “Improvement Club” that uses QI Connect as a means to bring together staff from across the hospital to share ideas for quality improvement.

 

“Our Improvement Club aims to promote quality improvement in the organisation. In general, the interest and engagement during each of the live QI Connect WebEx sessions has been great. The topics, the presentation and the different phases of each session have been excellent. After each live session, we spend 10-20 minutes discussing aspects relevant to our organisation in terms of our aspirations for developing our capacity for quality improvement ensuring we meet our vision to lead quality, research and innovation for NHSScotland.”

Pigeon kick scooter

The impact of
our work

Annual Report 2016 Case Studies

Pigeon kick scooter

Everyone in our organisation shares the same purpose:
to drive improvements in health and social care.

One organisation, many parts, one purpose

 

People in Scotland are living longer, healthier lives and, as the needs of our society are changing, so too are the nature and form of our health and social services. Our current health and social care system needs to change to cope with the demand that will be generated by our ageing population.

 

Right now, health and social care services across Scotland are undergoing unprecedented transformational change in the way services are organised and delivered in order to be fit for the future.

 

Our role is to support health and social care providers to continue to deliver the highest standards of care and to help them respond to integration and the changing needs of patients in a way that will be sustainable for years to come.

 

Everyone in our organisation shares the same purpose: to drive improvements in health and social care. In Healthcare Improvement Scotland we have a number of ways to support improvement and our organisation includes:

 

  • The Healthcare Environment Inspectorate, helping reduce the risk of healthcare associated infection to patients by inspecting hospitals in Scotland to ensure they are safe and clean.
  • The Improvement Hub (or ihub for short), supporting health and social care organisations to design and deliver services that better meet the changing needs of people in Scotland.
  •  The Scottish Health Council, supporting people to have a meaningful say in shaping health and social care services.
  •  The Scottish Medicines Consortium, accepting for routine use those newly-licensed medicines that are effective and clearly represent good value for money to NHSScotland.
  •  The Scottish Health Technologies Group, providing advice on the clinical and cost-effectiveness of healthcare technologies that are likely to have significant implications for patient care in Scotland.
  •  The Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network, developing evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for NHSScotland.

 

Our seven contributions

 

To support this transformational change, we have committed to making seven key contributions to improving health and social care services:

 

  • supporting the use of data and information, alongside bespoke support, to help services to improve
  • supporting people to have a meaningful say in how services are designed, delivered and experienced
  • providing independent quality assurance that gives people confidence in the quality of services and helps providers to improve
  • supporting providers to redesign services so that people in Scotland are able to live longer, healthier lives at home or a homely setting
  • supporting services to reduce harm, waste and unnecessary variation in practice and outcomes
  • providing evidence and knowledge that enables people to get the best out of the services that they use and helps services to improve, and
  • supporting leaders to create the conditions where quality will flourish.

 

Individually and collectively, these contributions help drive improvement in the care people receive across Scotland.

 

The following case studies illustrate how our work helps drive improvements for people and services across health and social care in Scotland. The case studies feature in our Annual Report 2016 which can be downloaded by using the link above.

 

 

Supporting the use of data and information, alongside bespoke support, to help services to improve

Rob's story

Rob McCulloch-Graham is Chief Officer of Edinburgh Health and Social Care Partnership. In September 2015, the Edinburgh Health and Social Care Partnership asked our Improvement Hub (ihub)to provide a package of improvement support to help them address their local priorities. The ihub’s Tailored and Responsive Improvement Support (TRIST) programme, which provides flexible improvement support to NHS boards and Health and Social Care Partnerships, is supporting the partnership by focusing on the following areas:

 

  • mapping the connections across the health and social care system in Edinburgh
  • supporting the partnership to deliver change, and to understand the benefits of this change for itself and for local service users, and
  • developing an evaluation to understand how the partnership is learning about the process of change they are going through and how that learning can be used to accelerate the pace of change.

 

“The Edinburgh Health and Social Care Partnership is currently delivering a huge programme of change, which includes the integration of two massive organisations, redesigning the entire pathway of care for service users to address the significant increases in demand and reduction in available resources, and eliminating delayed discharges. Healthcare Improvement Scotland’s ihub has played a key role supporting the process to date, primarily by mapping the whole system, applying improvement methodology, and providing additional capacity to support key initiatives. Throughout this process, Healthcare Improvement Scotland staff have felt like part of our team rather than outsiders.”

 

Supporting people to have a meaningful say in how services are designed, delivered and experienced

Ian's story

Ian Clement was first diagnosed with glaucoma more than 20 years ago and used his own perspective and experience to help us develop a new national guideline for clinicians to use which will help the referral and safe discharge of people with glaucoma across Scotland. Ian was a patient representative on the guideline development group and an important voice in the development of the guideline.

 

“As someone who has lived with glaucoma for more than 20 years, I was pleased to be given the opportunity to bring my own experience and insight to the guideline development group. I was able to offer the patient’s perspective on what are the most important considerations for people who have glaucoma. We developed a patient version of the guideline and I helped to shape its content, format and design. I believe the resulting booklet is an invaluable resource of information and advice for people who have glaucoma. It is written in plain language and uses a large font with graphics and bright colours so that it’s easier to read for people who may be visually impaired. Having all of this information in one accessible document helps to take away a lot of the fear that people may experience and provides real reassurance for those of us living with this condition.”

 

 

Providing independent quality assurance that gives people confidence in the quality of services and helps providers to improve

Rachael's story

Rachael MacDonald is a Midwifery Manager with NHS Grampian and has experienced a number of inspections on hospital safety and cleanliness – one of a number of ways Healthcare Improvement Scotland provides assessments of the quality of health and social care in Scotland which are designed to promote improvements.

 

“I’ve been involved in four or five inspections now and they are a welcome chance to look at what we are doing well and where we can improve. It can sometimes be difficult to do that in the business of our day-to-day work. Naturally, inspections can sometimes cause some staff a degree of apprehension beforehand but it’s clear that the inspectors’ main focus is to ensure that standards are met. Inspectors give advice and help us to spot any potential risks. The feedback we get is constructive, helpful and shows a great understanding of our circumstances and the challenges we face.”

 

Supporting providers to redesign services so that people in Scotland are able to live longer, healthier lives at home or a homely setting

Peter's story

Peter Anderson, 90, is a former professional world champion angler. In an illustrious career, he has taught hundreds of people to fish, including the Queen Mother and Frank Sinatra. Over the past year, he spent several weeks in hospital in NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde while being treated for an ischaemic foot (a lack of blood flow from the heart to the limb due to obstructed arteries). While in hospital, he also experienced severe delirium. Happily, he is now back at home and his recovery is continuing.

 

“It has been a difficult time for me as I was in a lot of pain and it wasn’t always easy to know what was going on but I can’t speak highly enough of the nurses and the care they provided. They were so attentive and kept me informed about my condition and what they were doing. They couldn't do enough for you, no matter how busy they were. They also put a ‘What matters to me’4 poster above my bed and this was a great help as it meant all of the nurses knew a bit more about me and could talk to me about my interests. It’s good to be back at home now, and I’ve even managed to do a bit of fishing since I was discharged.”

 

Supporting services to reduce harm, waste and unnecessary variation in practice and outcomes

Santosh's story

Santosh Salunke, Consultant Gastroenterologist with NHS Forth Valley, was a member of our expert advisory group that developed a national framework on biosimilar medicines (medicines which are similar to another medicine which has already been licensed).

 

“The development of national guidance around the use of biosimilar medicines, in particular those used for patients affected with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, is a significant achievement. This has had three major benefits. Firstly, it has guided hospitals in Scotland in redesigning the way they provide services to patients suffering from complex conditions. Secondly, it has provided a platform for clinicians to provide individualised and person-centred care. Finally, and above all, it has enabled our patients to have better access to treatments, as well as better access to education about their condition and treatment. This piece of work puts us in an excellent position where we are seeing real benefits to patients, services and NHSScotland as a whole.”

 

Lynne's story

Lynne Campbell was 30 weeks pregnant when she became aware that she hadn’t felt her unborn baby move for more than 24 hours. She recalled an earlier conversation with her midwife who had stressed the importance of being aware of the baby’s movements – a practice that is promoted by our Maternity and Children Quality Improvement Collaborative (MCQIC) – and that she should contact the hospital if anything changed.

 

“I was worried because the baby had previously been very active, but there had been little or no movement for a day or so. I remembered my midwife had told me not to hesitate to get in touch if anything changed and she had also given me some leaflets to take away. After reading the leaflets, we decided to call the midwife, even though it was the middle of the night. She advised us to come to the hospital immediately to get checked. Following some tests, I was urgently transferred by ambulance to the maternity unit in Dundee. Within 15 minutes, Innes was delivered by caesarean section. He was 10 weeks early, weighing only 3lbs and 15 oz, and was kept in hospital for a few weeks. Innes is now a happy, healthy little boy. I’m so thankful I had that conversation with the midwife, and that I read the leaflets she gave me.”

 

 

 

Providing evidence and knowledge that enables people to get the best out of the services that they use and helps services to improve

Eileen's story

Eileen Moulton is Operations Co-ordinator with Skin Conditions Campaign Scotland (SCCS), a registered charity which works to improve the care and treatment of people who live with skin conditions in Scotland. SCCS has made a number of patient submissions to the Scottish Medicines Consortium (SMC) relating to medicines that are licensed to treat conditions, including:

 

  • rosacea (a long-term skin condition which causes redness and a burning sensation in the face), and
  • chronic spontaneous urticaria (a distressing skin condition that causes red, swollen, itchy and sometimes painful hives).

 

“It is hugely important that SMC is listening to the patient voice. By sharing the real, lived experiences of people who live with skin conditions, we have helped to give SMC a real insight into the impact they can have on people’s lives. This means that SMC is not just looking at the clinical and cost effectiveness of medicines, it is also taking account of the psychological and practical aspects of having these conditions so that it can make fully informed decisions."

 

Supporting leaders to create the conditions where quality will flourish

Akintoye's story

Dr Akintoye Akinola is Specialty Doctor for Quality Improvement at the Golden Jubilee National Hospital, Clydebank. He co-ordinates an “Improvement Club” that uses QI Connect as a means to bring together staff from across the hospital to share ideas for quality improvement.

 

“Our Improvement Club aims to promote quality improvement in the organisation. In general, the interest and engagement during each of the live QI Connect WebEx sessions has been great. The topics, the presentation and the different phases of each session have been excellent. After each live session, we spend 10-20 minutes discussing aspects relevant to our organisation in terms of our aspirations for developing our capacity for quality improvement ensuring we meet our vision to lead quality, research and innovation for NHSScotland.”